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Country Handbooks


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Netherlands
| Visas and Residency


STUDENT VISA/RESIDENCE PERMIT

Note to ALL students
Health insurance

All students must be insured against the cost of medical treatment. This is a requirement under Dutch law.

Applying for a residence permit

ALL ISEP STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE A RESIDENCY PERMIT IF THEY ARE STUDYING FOR A SEMESTER OR LONGER. Please visit the Study in Holland Website for more specific information.

A residence permit looks like a credit card and proves that you are residing legally in the Netherlands. You are obliged to obtain a residence permit if you are a citizen of a non-EU/EEA country or Switzerland and you would like to stay in the Netherlands for a period of more than three months. A residence permit will generally be issued for a period of one year. Depending on the purpose of your stay, the validity may be for a longer or shorter period of time. In order to apply for a residence permit, your host institution will (with your help) fill out an application form that you have to sign. The institution will send it to the IND (Immigration and Naturalization Service) in Rijswijk if you arrived with an MVV (visa) and to the IND in Den Bosch if you arrived without an MVV. Please note that the fee for a residence permit is currently EUR 311.00 (as of April 2016). Please visit the administrative fees website for the most up to date cost information. It is very important to arrive with the correct visa!

Remember: if you enter the Netherlands on a short-stay visa, you won't be able to obtain a residence permit.

VISA AND RESIDENCE PERMIT REQUIREMENTS AND FEES CHANGE OFTEN. This information is provided as a procedural guide to obtain a Dutch Residence Permit (known as the VVRref-procedure). Please check with the appropriate Dutch embassy or consulate to confirm requirements and fees, or visit the Study in Holland Website.

Students from: Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Korea, and USA
Entry visa

You do not need a visa to enter the Netherlands, neither for a short, nor for a long stay. All you need is a valid passport.

Formalities on arrival
Staying less than 90 days
  1. You are required to report to the local Aliens Police within 3 days of arrival.
Staying longer than 90 days
  1. You are required to report to the local Aliens Police within 3 days of arrival
  2. You must apply for a residence permit. When your purpose of stay is to study here, your host institution (university or university of applied sciences) has to apply for the permit on your behalf, but you have to sign the application.
  3. You need to register with the local municipality as an inhabitant of the municipality within five days of your arrival
Registering with the university

You need to register at your host institution when you arrive, not only for getting your class schedules, but also to comply with immigration procedures. The host institution will want to see proof that you have reported to the Aliens Police, the municipality and, if applicable, will apply on your behalf for a residence permit which form you need to sign.

Work permit

Foreign students who would like to take paid work alongside their studies are allowed to do so. Depending on your nationality you can only do this for a limited amount of hours per week and only if the employer has applied for a work permit for you. You do need a work permit before you may work in the Netherlands. The following academic activities, among others, count as working: lecturing, doing a student traineeship or work placement, conducting research, and pursuing a doctorate or PhD (as AIO, for example). The employer must apply to the Central Organization for Work and Income for your work permit.

Students from the EU/EEA or Swiss-students (except for Bulgarians and Romanians)
Entry visa

You do not need a visa to enter the Netherlands, neither for a short, nor for a long stay. All you need is a valid passport. You may travel through all EU countries freely.

Registering with the university

You need to register at your host institution when you arrive, not only for getting your class schedules, but also to comply with immigration procedures. The host institution will want to see proof that you have reported to the Aliens Police, the municipality and, if applicable, will apply on your behalf for a residence permit which form you need to sign.

Work permit

You do not need a work permit. You are allowed to earn money alongside your studies or traineeship activities without a work permit. You can work as many hours as you want; there is no restriction.

 

Students from: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Malaysia, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Uruguay
Entry visa
Staying less than 90 days

You do not need an entry visa for the Netherlands. All you need is a valid passport. You are free to travel through all Schengen countries.

Staying longer than 90 days

You need an entry visa for the Netherlands. This entry visa is known as a provisional residence permit, abbreviated in Dutch to 'MVV' (machtiging tot voorlopig verblijf, MVV). Your host institution may seek advice from the IND concerning your application for an MVV. If the advice of the Dutch Immigration Service (IND) is favorable, you then have to apply for the actual MVV yourself at the Dutch embassy or consulate in your home country, or the country in which you legally reside. The Dutch embassy or consulate will then issue you with the MVV in the form of a sticker placed in your passport. It is extremely important that you have this visa before traveling to the Netherlands! You can also apply for an MVV without the help of your host institution. However, this procedure takes longer and is more expensive.

Formalities on Arrival
Staying less than 90 days
  1. You are required to report to the local Aliens Police within 3 days of arrival.
Staying longer than 90 days
  1. You are required to report to the local Aliens Police within 3 days of arrival
  2. You must apply for a residence permit. When your purpose of stay is to study here, your host institution (university or university of applied sciences) has to apply for the permit on your behalf, but you have to sign the application.
  3. You need to register with the local municipality as an inhabitant of the municipality within five days of your arrival
Registering with the university

You need to register at your host institution when you arrive, not only for getting your class schedules, but also to comply with immigration procedures. The host institution will want to see proof that you have reported to the Aliens Police, the municipality and, if applicable, will apply on your behalf for a residence permit which form you need to sign.

Work permit

Foreign students who would like to take paid work alongside their studies are allowed to do so. Depending on your nationality you can only do this for a limited amount of hours per week and only if the employer has applied for a work permit for you. You do need a work permit before you may work in the Netherlands. The following academic activities, among others, count as working: lecturing, doing a student traineeship or work placement, conducting research, and pursuing a doctorate or PhD (as AIO, for example). The employer must apply to the Central Organization for Work and Income for your work permit.

Students from: China

Chinese nationals must apply for a Nuffic Certificate in order to be eligible for a Dutch entry visa. A Nuffic Certificate is issued by Nuffic to provide an assessment of the studentís English language proficiency and of the authenticity of educational degrees and diplomas. Chinese students who wish to enroll in an English-taught program at a Dutch university must apply for this certificate. Upon issuance, the certificate will be sent directly to the Dutch university, and will then be forwarded to the Dutch immigration authorities. For more information about the Nuffic Certificate and how to apply please visit the Nuffic website.

A Note Regarding the Schengen Area

The Netherlands is a member of the Schengen area. Students should review the important regulations that dictate travel and visas within the Schengen area.

 

 

This information provides guidelines about the visa process. Visa regulations often change, and procedures can vary by Consulate and/or Embassy. Students should verify the current visa application procedures with the appropriate Consulate or Embassy before initiating the process. While every effort is made to ensure these guidelines are updated and as accurate as possible, ISEP cannot guarantee that the visa information posted is the most current.